Global survey finds buyers want EVs priced at $47k, with 468-km range

first_img COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS See More Videos The results of the study (dubbed “Accelerating the Evolution”) found that to achieve mass adoption, electric cars must, on average, offer 31-minute charging times; 468 km of range; and have a base price of US$36,000 (CDN$47,250).The price was the biggest factor for adoption, according to consumers, with charge time and range following in importance. Some 61 per cent of buyers are adopting a wait-and-see approach, hoping that battery technology will improve vastly before purchasing.Fleet managers are equally cautious, with 54 per cent of them saying they would wait for competitors to switch before doing so themselves.RELATED Motor Mouth: Can electric vehicles sell without incentives? The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever Why would an oil company commission a study to find out when EVs become viable? Well, Castrol’s hoping to diversify its products, and will soon offer “e-fluid” lubricants for EVs. advertisement Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 At a perfectly legal 100 km/h, the Leaf used about 20 kilowatt-hours per 100 kilometres. That works out to about 310 kilometres — a far cry from the 349 which Nissan claims, but it’s hardly worth mentioning. But bump up your speed to 130 km/h, however, and things go to hell in a hand-basket.  Handout / Nissan First Look: 2022 Lexus NX The sport-cute’s looks have been softened, but its powertrains and infotainment offerings have been sharpened Electric car sales have now surpassed stickshift sales in the U.S.“An equally critical challenge is helping consumers understand that, in many cases, the future that they want from electric vehicles is closer than they may think,” the study summarizes.So when will the tipping point occur? Some automakers have gotten close to reaching one or two of the criteria, but capturing the trifecta is a different story. Most consumers surveyed said they would consider buying an electric car by 2024, while the study itself predicts mainstream adoption will occur by 2032 in the U.S.; 2025 and 2027 in India and China; and 2031 in France. Trending Videos We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. RELATED TAGSNissanFlexElectric CarsElectric VehiclesNew VehiclesFlex Electric cars are becoming more and more popular, but most people are still a long way away from switching to plug-in power and away from reliable gasoline vehicles, Green Car Reports reports.Oil company Castrol commissioned a global survey to find out the tipping point where most consumers would be willing to take an EV over a fuel-burning car as a viable transportation option.The study surveyed 9,000 consumers, 750 fleet managers, and 30 automotive industry professionals in the United States, United Kingdom, Norway, France, Germany, India, China, and Japan. PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca Trending in Canada ‹ Previous Next ›last_img read more

Rural/Metro Settles Billing Claims

first_imgA federal investigation found that Rural/Metro’s Washington, D.C.-area division submitted false billings to the federal government for the costs of ambulance services for Medicaid recipients in the nation’s capital. The government said some transports were not medically necessary, not authorized under Medicaid, not provided at the level that was billed or not provided at all. Rural/Metro, which operates fire-protection and ambulance services to several Phoenix-area communities, agreed this month to pay $951,602 to settle the whistleblower case.Click here to read more. SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Rural/Metro Corp. has agreed to pay nearly $1 million to settle claims that the ambulance and fire-protection company improperly billed the federal government for ambulance services in the Washington, D.C., area.last_img read more