UBS profit soars 99 per cent on trading boom

first_img The investment banking division at Swiss lender UBS boomed in the third quarter (AFP via Getty Images) Also Read: UBS profit soars 99 per cent on trading boom “UBS has all the options open to write another successful chapter of its history under Ralph’s leadership.” Tuesday 20 October 2020 10:47 am whatsapp More From Our Partners Biden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comKamala Harris keeps list of reporters who don’t ‘understand’ her: reportnypost.comSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comBill Gates reportedly hoped Jeffrey Epstein would help him win a Nobelnypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.com Harry Robertson The Swiss lender’s wealth management arm – which has been a focus of departing chief executive Sergio Ermotti – also expanded despite the coronavirus pandemic. UBS said it had accrued $1bn for a cash dividend to be paid next year. It said the second installment of the 2019 dividend of $0.37 per share is to be paid out in November. The bank has also set aside $1.5bn for potential share repurchases. The third-quarter results are a high note for Ermotti to end on after nine years at the helm. He hands over to former ING boss Ralph Hamers next month. UBS’s net profit came in at $2.1bn (£1.62bn) in the three months ended September, the lender said in its latest financial statement today. It was up 99 per cent year on year and solidly beat expectations of $1.56bn. Diluted earnings per share rose 101 per cent year on year to $0.56, from $0.28 a year earlier. Share whatsappcenter_img Tags: UBS Within that, global markets revenue jumped 42 per cent. It benefitted from the sale of intellectual property rights concerning indexes. But also from “higher client activity levels, resulting from market volatility, notably within equity derivatives, credit, FX and cash equities”. “Our third quarter results continue to demonstrate that our strategy is differentiating us as we continuously adapt and accelerate the pace of change,” Ermotti said. The bank’s tier one capital ratio was 13.5 per cent in the third quarter of the year. It made a 21.9 per cent return on CET1 capital. UBS reaped the benefits of the rebound in global markets in the third quarter, with its investment banking arm helping the overall business achieve a 99 per cent jump in profit. Profit before tax at the lender’s investment banking arm soared 268 per cent year on year, hitting $632m.  The investment banking division at Swiss lender UBS boomed in the third quarter (AFP via Getty Images) Also Read: UBS profit soars 99 per cent on trading boom Global wealth management’s profit before tax rose 18 per cent year on year to $1.06m. High levels of client activity helped operating income grow three per cent. Meanwhile, greater market volatility led to a 16 per cent improvement in transaction-based income. The investment banking division at Swiss lender UBS boomed in the third quarter (AFP via Getty Images) UBS profit soars 99 per cent on trading boom It comes after the big US banks posted a mixed set of quarterly earnings. The jump in market activity helped those focused on investment banking. But retail-focused lenders continued to suffer during the Covid downturn. Show Comments ▼last_img read more

Staged By The Belle

first_imgUncategorizedStaged By The BelleBy Amy Wallace – February 6, 2012485ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItBeth Henley is known for her tales of the South, but she calls L.A. homeIt took Beth Henley five years to write her eerie new play, The Jacksonian, “not to mention my whole life,” she says. “It was a long haul.” The play, which runs February 7 through March 18 at the Geffen Playhouse, revolves around a mysterious murder and is set in Henley’s hometown of Jackson, Mississippi. But the 59-year-old prize-winning playwright wrote it here in Los Angeles, where she has lived since 1976. The first reading was in her Westwood living room, with her friends Amy Madigan and Ed Harris voicing the roles they now bring to the stage. Madigan and Harris are married, as are their characters in the play, but that didn’t occur to Henley when they were cast. “I didn’t think, ‘Oh, they’re married.’ I was thinking, ‘Oh, they’re brilliant.’ ”The same has been said of Henley, whose first produced play, Crimes of the Heart, won a Pulitzer in 1981 and was turned into a well-received film whose adapted screenplay (also by Henley) nabbed an Oscar nomination. As with her next four plays, Crimes was set in the South. She’s tried other settings—Wyoming, California—but The Jacksonian is the result, she says, of “winding my way back.”Henley, who is also a professor at Loyola Marymount University and an actress, appreciates the simple things about life here: the winter light, the outdoor spaces. She writes first drafts in pencil because “you can do it anywhere—at a coffee shop, in your car, on the couch, under your covers.” So why not reside where theater is king? “I love New York, but every time I go there I have so much fun, I get nothing done,” she says. “At eight o’clock in New York there are plays all over town, and that’s so beautiful because there’s such a sense of community. But opening a play in New York is always terrifying because it’s so cut-and-dried. Such a blood sport. Here I’m capable of working.”Photograph by Nancy Pastor  TAGSL.A. Culture2012February 2012Previous articleCacophony In Santa Ana This SaturdayNext articleHow to Wear… Red LipstickAmy Wallace RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORFollow in Pee-wee Herman’s Footsteps Across L.A.What Defines a Successful Immigrant?The Undocumented Immigrants Who Are Redefining ‘American’last_img read more

7 questions to watch after criminal charges filed in the Theranos saga

first_img Jeff Chiu/AP @damiangarde The two chose different paths three months ago, when the Securities and Exchange Commission charged them with massive fraud in a civil case. Holmes immediately settled with authorities, agreeing to pay $500,000 without admitting or denying guilt. But Balwani opted to fight the charges, and he’s due in court later this summer.2. Will Holmes and/or Balwani try the my-ex-duped-me defense?Adding intrigue to the case is the fact that Holmes, 34, and Balwani, 53, were romantically involved for years while they ran the company as a duopoly. According to Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou’s new book about the scandal, they got together not long after Holmes dropped out of Stanford at age 19 to start Theranos in 2003 — and broke up in the spring of 2016, when Holmes pushed Balwani out of the company as Theranos’s troubles mounted.advertisement Tags diagnosticslegal All of which points to the possibility of a tried-and-true defense: I was tricked by my lover.Don’t be surprised if Holmes’s defense tries to point the finger at Balwani, and Balwani’s at Holmes. Meanwhile, a statement put out on Friday from Jeffrey Coopersmith, the attorney representing Balwani, offers an early hint of what Balwani’s defense might look like, painting Balwani as an honest, well-meaning hard worker whose business simply failed. It’s worth noting that the statement doesn’t once mention Holmes, but you can expect that to change.3. What will happen to Theranos?Last we heard, the blood-testing company was working on a technology called “MiniLab” that would test blood drawn the old-fashioned way — with a needle in the arm — rather than the promised finger prick that made Theranos famous. Now, in a move timed with the unsealing of the indictment, Holmes is out as CEO. Her replacement is David Taylor, the company’s general counsel.Taylor is walking into a difficult situation. The company is running out of money, and it debts are piling up. According to the Wall Street Journal, if Theranos can’t turn things around, creditor Fortress Investment Group could seize the company’s assets and force it to liquidate as early as this summer.4. Will there be a reckoning for Theranos’s high-profile supporters?Among Holmes’s most voluble fans were Sens. John McCain and Joe Biden, CNBC star Jim Cramer, and former Secretary of State George Shultz. To date, not one has spoken out against Theranos or recanted his prior cheerleading. But each could face questions about what he knew and when. STAT+: Business7 questions to watch after criminal charges filed in the Theranos saga About the Authors Reprints By Rebecca Robbins and Damian Garde June 18, 2018 Reprints Please enter a valid email address.center_img NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. Leave this field empty if you’re human: McCain spoke highly of the company throughout 2015, promoting Theranos’s work in Arizona and tweeting a photo of himself with Holmes on the very day the Wall Street Journal’s first exposé went to print. The same year, Biden called Theranos’ California facility “the laboratory of the future.” Neither has mentioned the company since.As for Cramer, he hosted Holmes on “Mad Money” the day after the first Journal story, giving her a friendly and uncritical platform to deny the allegations against Theranos. Shultz, now 97, may have the most to answer for, as the Journal’s reporting revealed that after his grandson, Tyler, blew the whistle on Theranos, the former secretary of state repeatedly pressured him to keep quiet.5. If there is a trial, who will testify?Expect the government to try to bring forward as star witnesses some of the former Theranos employees who blew the whistle on the company, including the younger Shultz. Theranos’ investors and partners, some of whom have already sued the company, could also be called to the stand to detail how Holmes and Balwani duped them into parting with their money.The defense, meanwhile, may have a harder time. As the world came crashing down around Theranos, only one voice has persistently defended it: Tim Draper, a storied Silicon Valley investor and a partner at DFJ, has repeatedly spoken up for Holmes and accused the media of unfairly persecuting her. He could serve as a character witness for a defendant who appears to have few remaining friends.6. What new details could be brought to light in a trial?Each new Theranos revelation seems to layer in power, corruption, and celebrity. And a public trial could tease out yet more.Carreyrou’s new book shows that the deception at Theranos began as early as 2006, but a trial could unveil more detail about how far back the deception went. A trial could also shine more light on the lies that Holmes and Balwani told investors about the state of their business and their capabilities of their technology. And it could reveal more examples of the harm that the company’s blood tests sold in Walgreens stores in California and Arizona may have inflicted on patients.7. How much public attention could a trial command?The 1990s brought the O.J. Simpson trial. In the 2000s, it was Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff. Will this decade’s big court trial be about blood testing?It seems possible. Those other historic trials brought celebrity, wealth, and can’t-look-away coverage — all ingredients that a criminal trial over fraud at Theranos seems poised to deliver. National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. Damian Garde SAN FRANCISCO — Federal prosecutors on Friday filed criminal charges against Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes and the company’s former president Sunny Balwani — marking a pivotal turning point in a scandal that has rocked the business world and captivated the public imagination.So, what’s next for the Silicon Valley villains of the moment? Here are seven questions to watch as the case moves forward.1. Will the case go to trial?Holmes and Balwani are facing serious allegations: nine counts related to defrauding investors, patients, and doctors, carrying a penalty of up to 20 years in prison and up to $2.7 million in fines. Holmes and Balwani seem likely to go to trial, though it’s possible one or both of them could avoid the hoopla with a guilty plea.advertisement [email protected] Exclusive analysis of biopharma, health policy, and the life sciences. Privacy Policylast_img read more

Diplomats should not be jilted on jab

first_imgDiplomats should not be jilted on jab ACFID – Australia’s peak body for international humanitarian NGOs in Australia – is urging the Australian Government to reverse its position on denying priority access to coronavirus vaccines for Australian diplomats, including aid and consular staff. ACFID said reports of denying diplomats vaccinations threatens Australia’s national interest.Marc Purcell, CEO of the Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) said:“Australia’s diplomats are on the frontline working to get Australians home from places where COVID-19 is rampant. Yet, they are being left exposed. We think the Government has the responsibility to protect all Commonwealth employees who are at risk.“The Government has rightfully specified that Commonwealth employees who encounter travellers as part of their work will be at the front of the queue, yet according to reports, Australian diplomats and consular staff posted overseas are being left out. This is unnecessarily stressful for staff and their families – and if left unaddressed – is clearly an irresponsible approach.“At a time when DFAT is under pressure and facing multiple consular, geopolitical and development challenges, Australia needs their staff operating at full tilt: assisting Australians overseas; prosecuting Australia’s interests; and building partnerships through helping other nations bearing the brunt of COVID-19.“The Government has a responsibility to rectify this situation immediately and protect Commonwealth employees who are putting themselves at risk on behalf of Australia.”ACFID is also requesting priority access for COVID-19 vaccines to essential humanitarian and development workers engaged in the Australian development program.Australia has a strong track record of assisting neighbouring nations in response to natural disasters including cyclones and tsunamis across the region. Australia’s humanitarian assistance will suffer if diplomats and aid workers are not vaccinated.Purcell continued:“In addition to DFAT staff working at overseas posts, Australian development workers will be assisting in the vaccine roll-out in the region, combatting vaccine hesitancy and are deployed in humanitarian emergencies, alongside diplomatic and defence personnel.”The International Development Contractors Community – representing aid managing contractors – has joined ACFID’s call.Stuart Schaefer, Chair of the IDCC, said:“We have a responsibility to protect our staff wherever they are working around the world. To continue development and humanitarian programs on behalf of the Australian Government, our essential frontline workers need to be protected from COVID-19.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, Australian Council for International Development, Australian Government, building, commonwealth, community, coronavirus, DFAT, diplomatic, Employees, frontline workers, Government, Humanitarian, peak body, Vaccineslast_img read more

Top research stories of the week: Sept. 8 edition

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The Voyager spacecraft: 40 years in space, surreal solar system discoveries In 1977, NASA launched two space probes destined to forever upend our view of the solar system. Decades later, the discoveries continue to dazzle. CU Boulder scientists, who designed and built identical instruments for Voyager 1 and Voyager 2, were as stunned as anyone when the spacecraft began sending back data to Earth. Read more, listen to the podcast or watch the video CU Boulder lands funding for advanced study of gene-environment interactions Jason Boardman has made headlines studying the interactions between people’s genes and their environment. Now he’s helping launch a first-of-its-kind program to train young scholars in the cross-disciplinary field. The National Institute on Aging has awarded Boardman and CU Boulder professor Michael Stallings $595,666 over three years to create a formal training program in the area. Read more New swarming drone technology could help find lost hikers, study wildlife CU Boulder researchers have developed an advanced drone “swarming” technology that allows a single operator to control multiple unmanned aircraft for a variety of missions, which could include searching for lost hikers or studying wildlife. The team received the first-ever approval by the Federal Aviation Administration to conduct flights with a single pilot managing multiple aircraft. Read more Published: Sept. 8, 2017 This week’s top research highlights new drone technology, the study of gene-environment interactions and a look back at the Voyager spacecraft.last_img read more

The 2016 Blackbird Vineyards’ Proprietary Red Wines Have Landed

first_imgShare Previous articleTenuta Luce Selects La Place De Bordeaux to Represent Asia, Middle East & Africa MarketsNext articleMotivation Starts with You Press Release Linkedin Facebook TAGSBlackbird VineyardsConsumer Email Home Industry News Releases The 2016 Blackbird Vineyards’ Proprietary Red Wines Have LandedIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessThe 2016 Blackbird Vineyards’ Proprietary Red Wines Have LandedBy Press Release – March 19, 2019 243 0 Advertisement (NAPA VALLEY, CA; March 19, 2019) – Blackbird Vineyards announces the arrival of the 2016 Blackbird Vineyards Illustration, Paramour and Contrarian Wines, a stellar vintage from Napa Valley.“The stars aligned in 2016 to produce wines of wonderful concentration and balance. The wines have depth and will age beautifully. These wines are crafted with finesse, all the while showing incredible complexity. As providence would have it we have been blessed with a string of wonderful vintages from 2012 to 2018, surely 2016 will be remembered as one of the best.” -Winemaker, Aaron PottFEATURED RELEASES2016 Blackbird Vineyards Illustration78% Merlot, 21% Cabernet Franc, and 1% Cabernet Sauvignon94 Points2016 Blackbird Vineyards Paramour82% Cabernet Franc, 15% Merlot and 3% Cabernet Sauvignon94 Points2016 Blackbird Vineyards Contrarian64% Cabernet Sauvignon, 29% Cabernet Franc and 7% Merlot93+ PointsBlackMail MembershipBlackMail is Blackbird Vineyards’ Wine Membership Program that allows members to take control of their wine collection. Curation allows customers to select their preferred Napa Valley wines, frequency and quantity, no strings attached. BlackMail is Napa Membership Uncompromised.Pricing in Perpetuity – Guaranteed price for lifeBespoke Benefits – Our gift of one-of-a-kind Bespoke experiencesBlackMail Wines – Access to limited edition, members only winesPremium Access – Acquire the entire portfolio of Blackbird Vineyard winesComplimentary Tastings – Private tasting experiences at RiverHouse in downtown NapaAbout Blackbird VineyardsFounded in 2003 by Michael Polenske, Blackbird Vineyards is an artisanal producer of Right-bank-inspired wines from the Napa Valley. Planted in 1997, the estate vineyard is located in the heart of the Oak Knoll District—a region appreciated for its moderate climate and deep, gravelly soils. The vineyard’s valley floor topography presents optimum growing conditions for winemaker, Aaron Pott, to produce elegantly-styled, appropriately-balanced red wines that offer short and long-term cellaring potential. Advertisement ReddIt Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

District debates separation costs

first_imgHomeNewsEducationDistrict debates separation costs Jun. 01, 2017 at 7:00 amEducationNewsDistrict debates separation costsMarina Andalon4 years agoboard of educationdaily pressMalibuSanta Monicasanta monica educationSanta Monica-Malibu Unified School Districtsmmusd  Malibu parents want their own school district but based on the most recent Santa Monica – Malibu Unified School District Board meeting, the cost is still unknown.On May 30, the SMMUSD Board of Education met at Malibu City Hall for a special meeting to discuss updated financial projects for potentially splitting the district in two (confusingly known as “unification”). After a year of work the most recent projections show a diminishing picture for a standalone Santa Monica School District and the Board is now faced with a tough decision over its commitment to a fiscally equitable split.The Board has previously stated they support the community’s desire for the separation of Santa Monica and Malibu schools, as both cities are capable of providing positive educational opportunities. However, their support has been based on a requirement that a split does not have a negative impact on the financial condition of the remaining Santa Monica students.Maria Leon-Vazquez said she recognizes the Malibu voices have gotten much louder in the past six or seven years. She said the process is taking longer than anyone would like because the finances are so complicated and if separated there is a strong possibility students within the Santa Monica community could lose programs or other educational benefits.“Me being here has been to make sure we support all students no matter what their economic situation is,” said Leon-Vazquez. “As we move forward we need to make sure we look closer to the financial pieces of what the separation would look like.”The report was presented by the six-member, Malibu Unification Negotiation Committee (MUNC). With three members representing Santa Monica and three representing Malibu, the group has researched and presented information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of each city having their own individual school district.MUNC has documented the funding gap prior to Tuesday’s meeting and possible solutions include the Malibu community providing ‘alimony’ to Santa Monica to help fill the financial gap, known as “delta.”However, in the report the MUNC was unable to determine how long payments should last or even how large a payment would be needed.The Board has consistently asked for options that would allow the unification without a financial deficit for either district. Their hope was to find the perfect formula and answer from the MUNC. However, they were unable to provide the desired answer.The report stated the delta will never go to zero in the future and said if the Board direction is to veto any split that does not cover delta every year then there is no solution and probably won’t be a solution. If the Board wants to go in a different direction, negotiators do not mind going back to find a different calculation.“From someone who has been doing this for 34 years, I don’t believe it’s a reasonable expectation to expect a formula here that will go until the delta is eliminated,” said Janece Maez, Associate Superintendent Business & Fiscal Services CFO.The MUNC made it clear the delta is based on assumptions and there is no definite answer that can be given as to its eventual total.“The numbers vary so much by small changes in the asset values. At the end of the day, this is going to be a gut decision that the board needs to make without the analysis,” said Manel Sweetmore, MUNC member representing the Malibu team.The Board did not express strong support for or against unification. However, many board members did express a commitment that all students within both district receive the best education possible.Board member Craig Foster said, “I want to make sure Santa Monica is taken care of as well as Malibu.”Board member Jon Kean was on the same page.“What we are trying to do here is find a financial way to unwind a partnership without negatively impacting the students,” he said.Malibu locals continue to express their strong dedication and commitment to separating from Santa Monica.Malibu Mother, Desi Bradley said, “I have recognized a lot of disconnect from our two communities, it’s geographical and demographical.”Councilmember Rick Mullen said this issue is one that unites all of Malibu City Council.“We support community wide and all council members support an independent school district. I want to make it clear that everyone in Malibu is interested and dedicated to the idea of Malibu having its own school district,” he said.As of now the school board is continuing on an exploratory path toward Malibu Unification with cautious optimism.“They are committed to the original charge of MUNC to ensure that a SMUSD district will not suffer adverse financial harm in a separation, as they continue to work through the complex financial component of this process,” said SMMUSD Communications Officer Gail Pinsker. “The school board has and always will care about all students in SMMUSD.”Tuesday’s meeting was a study session and the Board was not required to take any specific action. Discussions will continue and the topic will return to a formal Board meeting at an as yet unspecified [email protected] :board of educationdaily pressMalibuSanta Monicasanta monica educationSanta Monica-Malibu Unified School Districtsmmusdshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentMarina Andalonview all postsBail set at $50,000 for homeless manTime to Delete Voice MailYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall11 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press22 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press22 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson22 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter22 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor22 hours agolast_img read more

PlayTime: A Summer in Portugal

first_imgHomeLifeEntertainmentArtsPlayTime: A Summer in Portugal Oct. 24, 2019 at 1:00 pmArtsColumnsEntertainmentFeaturedNewsPlay TimePlayTime: A Summer in PortugalCynthia Citron2 years agoira sachsIsabelle HuppertPortugal Many people who were lucky enough to see Ira Sachs’ 2014 movie “Love Is Strange” considered it one of the best films of that year. Including me. A beautiful film starring Alfred Molina and John Lithgow as a loving couple who have been together for 39 years and are finally allowed to marry legally, they exude warmth and humor and kindness — the kind of relationship that everybody would want. It is a delightful adventure-laden American-style film, set in New York City.Sachs’ current film, “Frankie” is that 2014 film turned inside out, but it is still an engrossing work of art. It is set in Sintra, Portugal, where a large group of friends and family have come to enjoy a brief summer vacation in a wildly beautiful area of the turquoise sea, surrounded by the greenery of a densely packed forest.The woman who has apparently gotten them all together is Frankie, an international film star whose first and second husbands are part of the entourage, plus her adult son, plus her hairdresser and her hairdresser’s boyfriend, plus people from the neighborhood who show up periodicallywith opinions and problems of their own. Most of the problems, however, deal with love. The quest for it. The uncertainty of it. The doubts about commitment. But the biggest problem is Frankie’s, which we learn about late in the film. She has an illness that is not only debilitating, but terminal.So all the painful confessions and doubts do not make a film wherein everybody lives happily ever after. But nevertheless you wind up liking them all very much and wishing them well.As I noted earlier, this film is an engrossing work of art. But not an American-style film. It is very European, with long, soulful closeups and lingering moments of scenery and conversation, much of it not in English.Perhaps Americans as a whole are not as sophisticated as European movie-goers and need to have everything spelled out for them. Or with subtitles, at least. We are a generation used to the quick cuts of television and decisive explanations for everything that is said.But anyone who has come to appreciate the slower pace of European films will enjoy writer/director Ira Sachs’ new offering (co-written with Mauricio Zacharias) very much indeed. And the distinctive presence of Isabelle Huppert as Frankie, Marisa Tomei as her devoted friend, and Jeremie Renier and Brendan Gleeson as Frankie’s two look-alike husbands, give this film a sweet aura of authenticity and charm.“Frankie” will be released tomorrow (October 25th) in New York and Los Angeles. Look for it at your neighborhood theaters. And enjoy!Cynthia Citron has lived and worked on every continent except Antarctica as a journalist, award-winning magazine editor, public relations director and screenwriter. She can be reached at [email protected] :ira sachsIsabelle HuppertPortugalshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentCrime Watch: Say it, don’t spray itLaughing Matters – Being funny can come with a priceYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall7 hours agoEntertainmentLifeNoteworthyTales of Two DaughtersCharles Andrews13 hours agoColumnsOpinionYour Column HereBring Back Library ServicesGuest Author13 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson18 hours agoFeaturedNewsProtesting parents and Snapchat remain in disagreement over child protection policiesClara Harter18 hours agoFeaturedNewsDowntown grocery to become mixed use developmenteditor18 hours agolast_img read more

Residents Asked to Take Steps in Preventing Bear Conflicts

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Wildlife and city officials are asking people to secure their garbage and put away other attractants, such as fallen apples and bird feeders, to promote safety on behalf of both residents and bears. As a reminder of the consequences bears often face after getting into food left out by humans, a recent press release from the Whitefish Police Chief Bill Dial used the phrase: “a fed bear is a dead bear.” Dial is referring to euthanasia, which is often the fate of food-conditioned bears. Within a two-week span in early September, two grizzly bears were captured in the Whitefish area after getting into human-derived food sources. A bear captured Sept. 5 along the Stillwater River near KM Ranch Road was euthanized due to its history of food-conditioned behavior, while a bear captured Sept. 15 just southeast of town was released into the Whitefish Range’s Whale Creek Drainage. The 238-pound male grizzly that was euthanized had been getting into livestock feed, pet food, bird feeders, garbage and apples. The second grizzly, a 271-pound male, was feeding on unsecured garbage and fallen apples, according to Tim Manley, a grizzly bear management specialist with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. The garbage dumpster on the property where the bear was captured was replaced with a bear-resistant container. The grizzly was fitted with a GPS radio collar so biologists can follow its movements. In Whitefish, city code requires residents who live north of the railroad to “secure their garbage containers in an area that is not accessible to bears,” Dial said. The chief added that bears generally visit town at night, so garbage containers should be transferred from their bear-proof storage to the street for collection no earlier than 4 a.m. and returned to the secure area no later than 7 p.m. the same day. Bear-proof containers are available by contacting the Whitefish public works department at 863-2456. Residents who violate the bear ordinance face a fine up to $500. “Additionally, residents are encouraged to keep pet food and bird feeders out of bear reach and to keep their yards free of fruit from fruit trees and vegetables as these too attract our furry neighbors,” Dial said. “By no means should anyone attempt to feed bears,” he added. “Bears who frequent inhabited areas are usually euthanized. Let’s respect the bears and keep our community safe.”The Swan Ecosystem Center, a nonprofit organization that operates out of the U.S. Forest Service Condon Work Center, notes that “fall is a busy time” for bear encounters as natural foods decrease and hungry bears are still feeding heartily before winter. The nonprofit described three recent bear conflicts in the Swan Valley, including a black bear that has been frequenting Owl Packer Camp and munching on food from coolers. Another bear had broken into a shed and eaten grain, while another chewed on bear-resistant containers in Rumble Creek. The containers stayed closed.The Swan Ecosystem Center encourages people to report bear conflicts to wildlife managers.“Reporting of bear conflicts helps bear managers understand where bear problems are occurring and prioritize their efforts,” the organization said. Emaillast_img read more

Some refuse companies proceeding with pay by weight scheme – claim

first_imgIt’s claimed that some refuse companies are proceeding with the pay by weight scheme despite the Government deferring it to next year.The system was set to be applied from January, allowing people six months to monitor the changes and opt in to the new scheme before full implementation.The issue caused controversy when waste collectors were accused of using the change to hike charges.Councillor Patrick McGowan believes any waste collection company who goes ahead with the scheme should have their licence removed:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/patrickbins1pm-1.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Disruption to cancer service will increase mortality – Oncologist By admin – December 9, 2016 Pinterest Twitter Consultation launched on proposal to limit HGV traffic in Clady Twitter WhatsApp Donegal hoteliers enjoy morale boost as bookings increase Previous articleOvercrowding situation at Letterkenny University Hospital eases considerablyNext articleCllr McEniff may never be able to give evidence in alleged assault case court hears admin Some refuse companies proceeding with pay by weight scheme – claim Facebookcenter_img Google+ Facebook WhatsApp Hospitalisations rise as Donnelly suggests masks will stay ’til autumn Today is the 30th anniversary of Eddie Fullerton’s murder Pinterest Homepage BannerNews RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 45 new social homes to be built in Dungloe Google+last_img read more